Remission?

abuse, Authoress, endometriosis, medication, ptsd, rapid-cycle bipolar disorder, three hopeful thoughts

 

Also pictured: Beast-baby Dorian T. Catsby on his king-of-the-house perch

I can’t remember the last time I was sad. Granted, my memory’s not great, and there was a lot of crying last week because of all the trauma that was suddenly dragged to the surface, but now that I’ve made my peace with that—or at least, beaten the beast back into its cage, tucked safely away deep underground—I feel good. Not hypomanic- or manic-good, but balanced, settled. Things aren’t going the greatest right now, but at least I have the concrete knowledge that they’re going to get better sooner rather than later.

Current medications:

  • 200 mg lamotrigine (Lamictal) taken twice a day, once in the morning and once in the afternoon/at night (usually around 6:00 or so).
  • 1 mg tabs of lorazepam (Ativan), as needed. Since the myoclonic jerks I began experiencing when my Effexor dose was too high have begun to subside, I’m finding that I don’t need this as often.
  • 300 mg lithium taken three times a day, two in the morning and one at night
  • 125 mg venlafaxine (Effexor), taken in the morning
  • 50 mg hydroxizine for sleep, one to two capsules as needed

This regimen seems to be working well for me. I’m sort of scared that it’ll just stop working, which is what I’ve experienced in the past with psych meds as well as endometriosis treatments, but I’m trying to stay positive.

Speaking of endometriosis, I met my new pain doctor on Thursday; he and his PA are both excellent. She spent some time asking about the nature of my PTSD and then informed him, and he actually asked if it was okay if he examined me before inviting me to hop up on the table. That was a whole new experience for me, and while I don’t really like being treated that gingerly, it was obvious that he was making an effort to make me feel comfortable, and I appreciated that.

I had some trigger point injections done yesterday morning; the knot of muscle was located very low, well below the bikini line in my general pubic area, but I didn’t feel nervous about him touching the spot or doing the injections. Because of my initial impression of him, I found it very easy to trust him implicitly. First impressions matter.

Right now, I’m in quite a bit of pain…about a level 7, which isn’t fun but is something I can tough out. As D. has told me, I’m “a tough old broad, a bad motherfucker.” Several people have suggested I buy the Pulp Fiction wallet and after everything I’ve been through with the pain in the last few years, I just might. It feels like a cautery knife is running back and forth through my lower abdomen, but my mother assures me that this will subside in a few days.

In the meantime, I’m keeping busy—cross-stitching, reading Ruth Reichel’s food/bipolar mother memoirs, and bothering the beast-babies, as usual.

Readers, what do you use to distract yourselves?

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A brief update.

authoress in motion, major depression, medication, rapid-cycle bipolar disorder, three hopeful thoughts

This is just a brief update on my current meds, treatment plan, and moods. If you’re into videos and want to see the authoress in motion, check it out. 🙂

Transition.

a cure for what ails you, major depression, medication, ptsd, rapid-cycle bipolar disorder, three hopeful thoughts

At this point, I can’t say that I’m cured or that my bipolar is in remission, but something feels different. My mood swings aren’t as intense as they were before, and “Flat/numb” has replaced “Depressed” as my default mood state. I still can’t remember the last time I felt truly happy without also feeling some underlying negative emotion, but I actually feel hopeful.

My PTSD is still pretty bad. There’s some parking lot construction going on right outside our apartment, and when I had to walk past it yesterday to get home, I flinched, jumped about a foot, and had to clamp my hands down over my ears to get through the unrelenting roar of construction equipment. I felt embarrassed and remember thinking, “Normal people don’t act like this.” But I’m trying not to judge my reactions and emotions. My therapists over the years have all encouraged me to just experience them without having a knee-jerk response and assigning a morality to everything.

My derealization/depersonalization is present, as always, and I’ve been having unnerving spikes in severity that have unusual triggers…if I have my head turned or tilted a certain way and I say something/something is said to me, for example, the detached feeling increases tenfold and sticks around until I finally go to sleep. It seems to only happen in the late afternoon/early evening, but I’m still not sure what to make of it. But in spite of this, I feel like I’m finally starting to recover. I’ll deal with the emotional bit first; then, I’ll try to tackle my dissociation.

Medications: Lorazepam, 1 mg tablets*, 37.5 mg Effexor, 400 mg lamotrigine/Lamictal.

* I think it’s important to note that I can’t remember the last time I actually needed one of these.

Bipolar II, sans mania.

a cure for what ails you, major depression, medication, rapid-cycle bipolar disorder, stigma

After two hours of evaluation with my new psychiatrist, I received a new and totally different diagnosis: Bipolar II with mixed episodes, no actual mania. It was something D. and I had suspected for a while and had discussed extensively, but hearing it came as a bit of a shock.

And then I felt relief. The reason I’ve been feeling so shitty for the last six years is because antidepressants can make the bipolar cycling worse (my doctor also suspects I’m rapid-cycling), not because I had treatment-resistant depression.

My mother is bipolar. My uncle, who committed suicide years ago, may have been bipolar. And my grandfather’s alcoholism (self-medicating) and fits of temper could have been attributed to the disorder as well, according to my psychiatrist. There is very much a genetic component to the disease.

The game plan is to keep the 150 mg of Effexor in place for now while I continue climbing the lamotrigine ladder to 200 mg. Then, we’ll reevaluate at the end of the month and see how things are going.

I received the news less than an hour ago and am still sort of in shock, so I’m having a really weird mixture of emotions right now. I’m not quite sure how to feel about all this, though I’m glad I’ll finally be able to receive proper treatment. And, as I’ve told myself dozens of times over the last hour, it’s not like I’m a different person because I suddenly have a different diagnosis. It’s just that everything makes more sense.

I guess this was nothing to be afraid of after all.

Lamictal.

medication, ptsd, stigma, three hopeful thoughts

Supposedly, this is the drug that is going to make everything okay.

I met with my psychiatrist yesterday and learned that while it’s usually used as an anti-seizure medication, it works very well for the depressive portion of bipolar disorder. She’s hopeful that this will stabilize my moods and make everything feel less dismal, though I have to build up to the maintenance dosage slower than other patients because it can cause a nasty rash (I had a terrible full-body rash as a reaction to amoxicillin when I was a child, so she wants to be extra-careful).

She warned me that there’s a chance it could trigger a manic episode if I do, in fact, have undiagnosed bipolar disorder. I’m young, and it could be lying dormant for now–she said it wouldn’t be at all unusual if I remained in a depressive state for decades before experiencing mania for the first time.

I feel that, as an advocate for mental illness who tries to do something to fight the stigma every single day, it’s not great for me to say this…but I am secretly afraid that I’m bipolar. My mother is bipolar and when I was young, “You’re just like your mother!” was thrown at me whenever I was being difficult or acting out.

I’ve been educating myself on the disease, though, mostly through memoirs written by women with bipolar mothers. I know that it’s just another chemical imbalance and that I have nothing to fear, but at the same time, it seems like the proverbial big black dog, looming just out of sight. And there is a tremendous stigma surrounding bipolar individuals, which is awful. I am taking comfort in the knowledge that if I do indeed have the illness, I can do a lot of good work to help fight that stigma, too.

But is it so wrong for me to be terrified of being “just like my mother”? It’s not just the possibility of being bipolar that scares me–I was conditioned to fear and avoid any behavior that was even remotely reminiscent of the woman, though now I’m beginning to “take it back” by trying to take the positive aspects of her personality into myself–her carefree, fun-loving nature that I remember so well from her “good” days.

My relationship with my mother is a complicated one, so I’ll refrain from discussing it further in this post; I feel it deserves at least one post of its own, if not a series.

Did anyone else grow up with a mentally ill parent? How has it affected you?